Attention Old People Of ALL Ages!

Do you feel old? … Look old? … Think old? Every time I get together with certain friends, age is inevitably discussed. I cringe inwardly and get very busy...

Do you feel old? … Look old? … Think old?

Every time I get together with certain friends, age is inevitably discussed. I cringe inwardly and get very busy going “Cancel, Cancel!” in my mind. This is some of what’s said.

“That’s what happens when you get old.” “Especially at your age.” “Act your age, old man/lady.” “I can’t remember anything. Al’s been visiting.” “What’s the matter? You got A?” (Both are a reference to Alzheimer’s Disease. And, in my mind, it’s almost an invitation.)

Question Mark for Tame Your BrainWhat do each of those sentences say to your brain?

Your mind does the thinking.

Your mind is in charge of your brain.

Your brain is in charge of your nerves.

If your mind tells your brain that it is getting old — in other words if you are thinking these thoughts — your brain will relay the process of getting old to your body, usually more quickly than needed. Do you want that?

Let’s go back to your friends again. Now, you’re sitting there, and feeling old, with your friends. They are, in effect, telling you how life is going to be for you. Not only for you, but for everyone who is listening.

Of course, your response to reading the paragraph above might be, “No they aren’t. I know it doesn’t have to be that way.”

arrow2But it is going to be that way for you, unless… You do something.

And you’re probably saying, “I don’t believe that.”

Very good! You’re telling me, and ultimately your brain, that you don’t believe it. Isn’t that terrific? You are taking control.

But that isn’t how it is when you are talking to your friends, is it?

You’re not on your guard then. You are letting everything slip through. You laugh at the jokes about Alzheimer’s. You make your own jokes about memory. “You can tell me anything and it’ll be news to me.” “You can tell me that joke tomorrow. I’ll bet I’ll think it’s funny all over again.” “I can hide my own Easter eggs!”

You can joke about all the infirmities that happen to ‘old’ people. “Do you have to go to the bathroom or can you hold it? Answer: Depends.” “Do you want to go golfing or is Art visiting?” A reference to arthritis. Again, almost an invitation.

Some people accept that this happens to everyone who grows old.

I think, therefore I amThat it is inevitable.

NOT!

Some prefer to joke about it, ‘while they can.’ What kind of a mind set is that?

Hey, everyone grows old. When a person grows old, so do their friends, but some in entirely different ways. By the time a person IS ‘old’, he or she feels like they ‘know’ what is going to happen for the rest of their lives.

Some pretty much accept it.

They feel that they know that if ‘this’ happens, ‘that’ happens, then when ‘that’ happens, ‘this’ happens, and that’s the way life is.

Wrong!

If you can think, you can change your life.

Yes, people grow old. Some grow old fighting it all the way, hating it. Some grow old gracefully and lovingly… AND healthy.

stubborn like a donkeyUnfortunately, a lot of people unwittingly encourage the reactions they think growing old causes. “I know when so and so reached 40 (or 50 or 60 or 70) years old, her body just plain broke down. She got arthritis, she had a hysterectomy, her stomach kept getting upset, and on and on. Then, a friend chimes in.  “Yeah, almost that same thing happened to so and so and so and so and so, too.”

They then reach what they feel is the logical conclusion that, therefore, when they turn 40 or 50 or 60 or 70, all that stuff will happen to them, too.

You know the progression, you invite the progression, you encourage the progression. The progression begins to be you.

Well, it’s time to stop it, isn’t it?

Here’s what you can do:

ckmarkFirst, look at the picture you want of yourself, even when you are ‘older’. It’s a picture of love, self-confidence, high self-esteem, flexibility, strong bones, and prosperity in mind, body and soul. If those words don’t describe what you want, substitute the words that do.

ckmarkSecond, think of the thoughts that are going through your mind.

Take them one at a time, and ask yourself this question. “Does this thought help me BE picture I want to be?”

ckmarkThird, if it does, that’s terrific! Rejoice! If it doesn’t, continue to the fourth step.

ckmarkFourth, raise your arms and yell, “CANCEL! CANCEL!” * It’s a lot like someone scratching a phonograph record. You don’t want to listen to a scratched record, your brain won’t want to listen to these thoughts if they cause you to “CANCEL! CANCEL!” It’s like scratching the brain.*

ckmarkFifth, immediately think of an affirmation or two that you like.  They could be “I love. I am loving. I am loved.” or “I love myself and all creation.” or “Every day in every way, I am better, better, and better.”

If you’ve been reading my articles for a while, you know these are my favorite affirmations. However, you must use affirmations that YOU like. Fill the place in your brain that used to hold negative thoughts, with positive affirmations.

Remember, there is a huge difference between growing older and growing old.

No matter what you do, if you live another year, you have grown a year older. If you haven’t gotten smarter, you haven’t really lived. I say, if you’re alive, why not live life to the fullest?

sun100pxHow about programming tomorrow to be a day to enjoy?

You can still go for coffee and enjoy your relationships, but now you show by example that YOU don’t want to think ‘old’ thoughts. Simply don’t participate in saying them.

Don’t laugh when you hear them — a good analogy might be that that type of laughter is another nail in the coffin… Your friend’s or your coffin, who knows?

People will see that you have something good going here. When they are ready to learn and to change, show them this article. When they look at you and the changes you’ve made in your life, they will know that it is possible.

One more thing, make sure to help them along the way on their journey. They, and their family, will thank you for it.

Thanks for reading.

Jan Tincher

 

 

 

Jan Tincher

 

 

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Red_Ribbon150Dear Jan:

I liked your article [Attention Old People of All Ages] very much as I too believe that you are who you create. And peace does start from within.

Thanks for the article. So far it looks to me like you are doing the people that read your articles a good brain cleansing. I’m sure you have and will continue to help many with your work. I believe the world would be a better place if people did not have to face so many inabitions within themselves. Because a lot of the world is fighting so hard to defend their heritage, their feelings and even there decisions in life, only because they want people to except them and they feel like they are not living up to some standard that they set for themselves. So they end up angry and afraid all the time. Which in my opinion, has got to be one of the hardest ways to get through life there is.

I hope to read more good articles like that one, and I am sure I will learn something from each one I read from here on out.

Thanks again.
Cindy

 

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DISCLAIMER: Jan Tincher and/or “Tame Your Brain!” do not guarantee or warrant that the techniques and strategies portrayed will work for everyone. The techniques and strategies are general in nature and may not apply to everyone. The techniques and strategies are not intended to substitute for obtaining medical advice from the medical profession. Always consult your own professionals before making any life-changing decisions.

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