Deactivating Old Memory Triggers

Deactivating Old Memory Triggers

Deactivating old memory triggers. How do you do that?…

I’m going to show you how to replace old, negative feelings with good feelings. In other words, I will show you how to deactivate your old triggers.

Now this is going to take some concentration. You may need someone to help you, and that’s fine.

First, decide what you want to use as the trigger.

Sit down. Take the predominant hand — whichever hand you use all the time — and touch the knee on that side on a specific spot, just to see how it feels.

OK, now I’d like you to think of a time when you really succeeded. A time when you felt really great. A time when you didn’t think you could top that feeling. (If you can’t come up with an actual time, visualize an imaginary scene and feel the feelings.)  Remember, whatever works, works.

TIP: An article that will help you visualize this is What If Life Doesn’t Hand You A Lemon? Imagine It Anyway!

Now, when you get right at the top, where you are feeling TERRIFIC, touch your knee in the same spot you did earlier, only add pressure so you feel it.

Now, take your hand off. Think of something else. Anything else that is neutral.

Now, repeat the process: Think of a time when you really succeeded. A time when you felt really great. A time when you didn’t think you could top that feeling. When you get right at the top, where you are feeling TERRIFIC, touch your knee in the same spot and add the same amount of pressure as last time.

Now, take your hand off. Think of something else. Anything else that is neutral.

Now, repeat the process one more time.
When you are done, you will have anchored your trigger. We will call this your reservoir, your reservoir of good feelings.

Now, think of something that makes you react negatively, or makes you sad, or makes you out of control.

I think, therefore I amWhen you’ve thought of that thing, think of five times or instances that it happened. Start with the most recent, and end with the first time ever. We will call these instances your targets. Trigger your opposite knee for each instance. Make sure you really feel the feelings as you trigger at your lowest point, when you are feeling the worst.

Here is how the technique works.

Trigger your reservoir, then your first target – the first thing on your list.

If your reservoir is stronger, continue. If not, you will have to work more good feelings into your reservoir. Do not continue until you feel that your reservoir is definitely emitting stronger feelings than your negative anchor.

When you are ready to continue, double trigger — which means press both knees for the same amount of time, then release.

Wait until you are neutral, then continue the steps.

To sum up, trigger the reservoir, then your next target, make sure the reservoir is stronger, then trigger both knees.

Now future pace. To future pace means to look into the future where you are no longer bothered by your negative trigger. Enjoy the scene.

practiceWhen you double trigger the negative triggers in your life, you get rid of that old, negative feeling and bring on a good, powerful feeling.

If you like this technique, pass it on to a friend. Watch as their life changes for the better.

Thanks for reading.

Jan Tincher

 

 

Jan Tincher

 

Master Neuro Linguistic Programmer
TameYourBrain.com

P.S. If you aren’t enjoying life because of stress, if you feel that each day is harder to get up and go to work or just to get going, this is the course you should get. “How To Quickly Reduce Stress – In 6 Easy Sessions!” Click here!

 

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DISCLAIMER: Jan Tincher and/or *Tame Your Brain!* do not guarantee or warrant that the techniques and strategies portrayed will work for everyone. The techniques and strategies are general in nature and may not apply to everyone. The techniques and strategies are not intended to substitute for obtaining medical advice from the medical profession. Always consult your own professionals before making any life-changing decisions.

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